Thursday, October 23, 2014

Viewing Times For Today's Partial Solar Eclipse

A partial solar eclipse in spaceImage Credit: NASA

CAPE CANAVERAL, Florida -- On Thursday, October 23, 2014, a partial solar eclipse will be viewable to nearly everyone in the U.S. and Canada (with the exception of New England and Hawaii) just before sunset.
  

If you are asking, "What time does the solar eclipse begin?"  U.S. viewing times for today's solar eclipse is posted at the bottom of this article.


A partial solar eclipse is when the Moon passes in front of the Sun with a fraction of the Sun still remaining uncovered.  The portion of the Sun that the Moon will cover varies depending on the viewer's location.  


How to Safely Watch the Solar Eclipse 

 


According to NASA, coverage in the U.S. will range from 12% in Florida to nearly 70% in Alaska.   The greatest eclipse will be seen from Canada's Nunavut Territory near Prince of Wales Island where the eclipse in the horizon will have a magnitude of 0.811 (81% coverage).


Warning: Don't stare. Even at maximum eclipse, a sliver of sun peeking out from behind the Moon can still cause pain and eye damage.  Direct viewing should only be attempted with the aid of a safe solar filter. 



Below are U.S. viewing times by city for the beginning of the partial Solar Eclipse on October 23, 2014.  All times are in local Daylight Savings Time:


Atlanta, GA 6:00 p.m. 
Austin, TX 4:54 p.m. 
Baltimore, MD 5:51 p.m. 
Boston, MA 5:47  p.m. 
Cape Canaveral, FL 6:16 p.m.
Chicago, IL 4:36 p.m.
Cleveland, OH 5:42 p.m. 
Columbia, SC 6:02  p.m. 
Dallas, TX 4:48 p.m. 
Denver, CO 3:18  p.m. 
Des Moines, IA 4:30 p.m. 
Detroit, MI 5:39 p.m. 
Harrisburg, PA 5:49 p.m. 
Hartford, CT 5:48  p.m. 
Houston, TX 4:59  p.m. 
Indianapolis, IN 5:43  p.m. 
Jackson, MS 4:58  p.m. 
Juneau, AK 12:10  p.m. 
Kansas City, MO 4:35 p.m. 
Lincoln, NE 4:28 p.m. 
Little Rock, AR 4:49 p.m. 
Los Angeles, CA 2:08 p.m. 
Louisville, KY 5:47 p.m. 
Memphis, TN 4:50  p.m. 
Miami, FL 6:27  p.m. 
Milwaukee, WI 4:33 p.m. 
Minneapolis, MN 4:23 p.m. 
Montgomery, AL 5:02  p.m. 
Nashville, TN 4:51  p.m. 
New Orleans, LA 5:05 p.m. 
New York, NY 5:49 p.m. 
Oklahoma City, OK 4:40 p.m. 
Olympia, WA 1:35  p.m. 
Philadelphia, PA 5:51 p.m. 
Portland, OR 1:37 p.m. 
Raleigh, NC 5:59 p.m. 
Richmond, VA 5:55  p.m. 
Sacramento, CA 1:52 p.m. 
Salem, OR 1:38  p.m. 
Salt Lake City, UT 3:05 p.m. 
San Antonio, TX 4:56 p.m. 
San Diego, CA 2:14 p.m. 
San Francisco, CA 1:52p.m. 
San Jose, CA 1:54  p.m. 
Santa Fe, NM 3:27 p.m.   
Seattle, WA 1:35  p.m. 
Springfield, IL 4:39 p.m. 
St. Louis, MO 4:41  p.m.  
Tallahassee, FL 6:09 p.m. 
Topeka, KS 4:34 p.m. 
Washington, DC 5:52  p.m.  


Eclipse times derived from:  “Eclipses During 2014,” F. Espenak, Observers Handbook: 2014, Royal Astronomical Society of Canada. 

U.S. Viewing Times For October 23 Partial Solar Eclipse

A partial solar eclipse in spaceImage Credit: NASA

CAPE CANAVERAL, Florida -- On Thursday, October 23, 2014, a partial solar eclipse will be viewable to nearly everyone in the U.S. and Canada (with the exception of New England and Hawaii) just before sunset.


A partial solar eclipse is when the Moon passes in front of the Sun with a fraction of the Sun still remaining uncovered.  The portion of the Sun that the Moon will cover varies depending on the viewer's location.  


How to Safely Watch the Solar Eclipse 

 


According to NASA, coverage in the U.S. will range from 12% in Florida to nearly 70% in Alaska.   The greatest eclipse will be seen from Canada's Nunavut Territory near Prince of Wales Island where the eclipse in the horizon will have a magnitude of 0.811 (81% coverage).


Warning: Don't stare. Even at maximum eclipse, a sliver of sun peeking out from behind the Moon can still cause pain and eye damage.  Direct viewing should only be attempted with the aid of a safe solar filter. 



Below are U.S. viewing times by city for the beginning of the partial Solar Eclipse on October 23, 2014.  All times are in local Daylight Savings Time:


Atlanta, GA 6:00 p.m. 
Austin, TX 4:54 p.m. 
Baltimore, MD 5:51 p.m. 
Boston, MA 5:47  p.m. 
Cape Canaveral, FL 6:16 p.m.
Chicago, IL 4:36 p.m.
Cleveland, OH 5:42 p.m. 
Columbia, SC 6:02  p.m. 
Dallas, TX 4:48 p.m. 
Denver, CO 3:18  p.m. 
Des Moines, IA 4:30 p.m. 
Detroit, MI 5:39 p.m. 
Harrisburg, PA 5:49 p.m. 
Hartford, CT 5:48  p.m. 
Houston, TX 4:59  p.m. 
Indianapolis, IN 5:43  p.m. 
Jackson, MS 4:58  p.m. 
Juneau, AK 12:10  p.m. 
Kansas City, MO 4:35 p.m. 
Lincoln, NE 4:28 p.m. 
Little Rock, AR 4:49 p.m. 
Los Angeles, CA 2:08 p.m. 
Louisville, KY 5:47 p.m. 
Memphis, TN 4:50  p.m. 
Miami, FL 6:27  p.m. 
Milwaukee, WI 4:33 p.m. 
Minneapolis, MN 4:23 p.m. 
Montgomery, AL 5:02  p.m. 
Nashville, TN 4:51  p.m. 
New Orleans, LA 5:05 p.m. 
New York, NY 5:49 p.m. 
Oklahoma City, OK 4:40 p.m. 
Olympia, WA 1:35  p.m. 
Philadelphia, PA 5:51 p.m. 
Portland, OR 1:37 p.m. 
Raleigh, NC 5:59 p.m. 
Richmond, VA 5:55  p.m. 
Sacramento, CA 1:52 p.m. 
Salem, OR 1:38  p.m. 
Salt Lake City, UT 3:05 p.m. 
San Antonio, TX 4:56 p.m. 
San Diego, CA 2:14 p.m. 
San Francisco, CA 1:52p.m. 
San Jose, CA 1:54  p.m. 
Santa Fe, NM 3:27 p.m.   
Seattle, WA 1:35  p.m. 
Springfield, IL 4:39 p.m. 
St. Louis, MO 4:41  p.m.  
Tallahassee, FL 6:09 p.m. 
Topeka, KS 4:34 p.m. 
Washington, DC 5:52  p.m.  


Eclipse times derived from:  “Eclipses During 2014,” F. Espenak, Observers Handbook: 2014, Royal Astronomical Society of Canada. 

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Second Chance To Watch Meteor Shower On October 22

Orionids meteor captured by a NASA all sky meteor camera.
Image Credit: NASA/MSFC/MEO

CAPE CANAVERAL, Florida --   Don't worry if you missed the Orionids meteor shower this morning.  You will get a second chance to watch the 2014 Orionids Meteor Shower during the early morning of Wednesday, October 22, 2014.  


The Orionids meteor shower peaked Tuesday morning but should be nearly as spectacular on Wednesday morning thanks to dark skies from a New Moon that occurs on October 23.     


When is the best time to watch Orionids meteor shower?


The best time to watch this October meteor shower is one to two hours before sunrise.   


 
What are the best dates to watch the Orionids meteor shower in October 2014?


Dark night skies are best for watching meteors, so the Moon plays an important role as to which dates are best for meteor shower viewing.  The Moon will decrease in brightness every night until a New Moon occurs on October 23, 2014.  After the New Moon, the moonrise will not occur until after sunrise from the 24th through the 28th.  So the darkest predawn mornings closest to the meteor shower's peak are October 21-24, 2014.


"We expect to see about 20 meteors per hour when the shower peaks on Tuesday morning, Oct 21st," says Bill Cooke, the head of NASA's Meteoroid Environment Office.  "With no Moon to spoil the show, observing conditions should be ideal." 



Where to look for the 2014 Orionids Meteor Shower tonight:

Orion Constellation.  Image Credit: NASA
Find Orion's noticeable three-star belt in the night sky, then follow his raised arm to his elbow to see the origination point of the Orionids (see image above).  Orion will be almost straight above the viewer's head 1 to 2 hours before sunrise.


The Orionid Meteor Shower is named after the constellation Orion because the meteors appear to come from just north of Orion's bright star Betelgeuse.  It is made up of debris left by Halley's Comet with a debris field that is so wide that encompasses the entire distance between the Earth and the Moon. 

How to Safely Watch the Oct. 23 Partial Solar Eclipse

A partial solar eclipse in spaceImage Credit: NASA
During the late afternoon of Oct. 23, 2014, a partial solar eclipse will be visible from much of North America before sundown.  Partial eclipses occur when the moon blocks part of the sun from view.




Throughout history, total eclipses, in which the entire sun is blocked from view, have offered scientists the chance to see the faint light of the sun's atmosphere called the corona, without its being overwhelmed by the sun itself. 


However, it is never safe to look at the sun with the naked eye.  Even during a partial eclipse, when only a very small part of the sun is visible, viewing it without eye protection risks permanent eye damage or blindness. Listed below are a few ways of safely watching the eclipse.  No matter which recommended technique you choose, do not stare continuously at the sun. Take breaks and give your eyes a rest.  And, remember, don't use regular sunglasses -- they don't offer your eyes sufficient protection.


1) Projection: The safest and most inexpensive way to watch a partial solar eclipse is by projection. Place a pinhole or small opening in a card, and hold it between the sun and a screen – giant sheet of white paper works – a few feet away. An image of the sun will be seen on the screen. Projected images of the sun's crescent during an eclipse may even be seen on the ground in the small openings created by interlacing fingers, or in the dappled sunlight beneath a leafy tree. You can also use binoculars to project a magnified image of the sun on a white card. However, you must never look through the binoculars at the sun.


2) Filters: The sun can be viewed directly only when using filters specifically designed for this purpose. Such filters usually have a thin layer of aluminum, chromium or silver deposited on their surfaces. One of the most widely available filters for safe eclipse viewing is a #14 (or darker) welder's glass. A welding glass that permits you to see the landscape is not safe. Aluminized mylar manufactured specifically for solar observation can also be used. Mylar can easily be cut with scissors and adapted to any kind of box or viewing device. Only use filters that you know have been approved for solar viewing.  


Unsafe filters include color film, some non-silver black and white film, medical x-ray films with images on them, smoked glass, photographic neutral density filters and polarizing filters. Solar filters designed to thread into eyepieces, which are often sold with inexpensive telescopes are also dangerous.


3) Telescopes with solar filters: There are sun-specific telescopes available for sale -- or perhaps through a local astronomy club -- that are also safe for viewing a partial eclipse.



SOURCE:
 
Karen C. Fox
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.

Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Second Chance To Watch Meteor Shower Tonight

Orionids meteor captured by a NASA all sky meteor camera.
Image Credit: NASA/MSFC/MEO

CAPE CANAVERAL, Florida --   Don't worry if you missed the Orionids meteor shower this morning.  You will get a second chance to watch the 2014 Orionids Meteor Shower tonight.  


The Orionids meteor shower peaked Tuesday morning but should be nearly as spectacular on Wednesday morning thanks to dark skies from a New Moon that occurs on October 23.     


When is the best time to watch Orionids meteor shower?


The best time to watch this October meteor shower is one to two hours before sunrise.   


 
What are the best dates to watch the Orionids meteor shower in October 2014?


Dark night skies are best for watching meteors, so the Moon plays an important role as to which dates are best for meteor shower viewing.  The Moon will decrease in brightness every night until a New Moon occurs on October 23, 2014.  After the New Moon, the moonrise will not occur until after sunrise from the 24th through the 28th.  So the darkest predawn mornings closest to the meteor shower's peak are October 21-24, 2014.


"We expect to see about 20 meteors per hour when the shower peaks on Tuesday morning, Oct 21st," says Bill Cooke, the head of NASA's Meteoroid Environment Office.  "With no Moon to spoil the show, observing conditions should be ideal." 



Where to look for the 2014 Orionids Meteor Shower tonight:

Orion Constellation.  Image Credit: NASA
Find Orion's noticeable three-star belt in the night sky, then follow his raised arm to his elbow to see the origination point of the Orionids (see image above).  Orion will be almost straight above the viewer's head 1 to 2 hours before sunrise.


The Orionid Meteor Shower is named after the constellation Orion because the meteors appear to come from just north of Orion's bright star Betelgeuse.  It is made up of debris left by Halley's Comet with a debris field that is so wide that encompasses the entire distance between the Earth and the Moon. 

Partial Solar Eclipse on October 23

A partial solar eclipse in spaceImage Credit: NASA

CAPE CANAVERAL, Florida -- On Thursday, October 23, 2014, a partial solar eclipse will be viewable to nearly everyone in the U.S. and Canada (with the exception of New England and Hawaii) just before sunset.


A partial solar eclipse is when the Moon passes in front of the Sun with a fraction of the Sun still remaining uncovered.  The portion of the Sun that the Moon will cover varies depending on the viewer's location.  

How to Safely Watch the Oct. 23 Partial Solar Eclipse




According to NASA, coverage in the U.S. will range from 12% in Florida to nearly 70% in Alaska.   The greatest eclipse will be seen from Canada's Nunavut Territory near Prince of Wales Island where the eclipse in the horizon will have a magnitude of 0.811 (81% coverage).


Warning: Don't stare. Even at maximum eclipse, a sliver of sun peeking out from behind the Moon can still cause pain and eye damage.  Direct viewing should only be attempted with the aid of a safe solar filter. 



Below are U.S. viewing times by city for the beginning of the partial Solar Eclipse on October 23, 2014.  All times are in local Daylight Savings Time:


Atlanta, GA 6:00 p.m. 
Austin, TX 4:54 p.m. 
Baltimore, MD 5:51 p.m. 
Boston, MA 5:47  p.m. 
Cape Canaveral, FL 6:16 p.m.
Chicago, IL 4:36 p.m.
Cleveland, OH 5:42 p.m. 
Columbia, SC 6:02  p.m. 
Dallas, TX 4:48 p.m. 
Denver, CO 3:18  p.m. 
Des Moines, IA 4:30 p.m. 
Detroit, MI 5:39 p.m. 
Harrisburg, PA 5:49 p.m. 
Hartford, CT 5:48  p.m. 
Houston, TX 4:59  p.m. 
Indianapolis, IN 5:43  p.m. 
Jackson, MS 4:58  p.m. 
Juneau, AK 12:10  p.m. 
Kansas City, MO 4:35 p.m. 
Lincoln, NE 4:28 p.m. 
Little Rock, AR 4:49 p.m. 
Los Angeles, CA 2:08 p.m. 
Louisville, KY 5:47 p.m. 
Memphis, TN 4:50  p.m. 
Miami, FL 6:27  p.m. 
Milwaukee, WI 4:33 p.m. 
Minneapolis, MN 4:23 p.m. 
Montgomery, AL 5:02  p.m. 
Nashville, TN 4:51  p.m. 
New Orleans, LA 5:05 p.m. 
New York, NY 5:49 p.m. 
Oklahoma City, OK 4:40 p.m. 
Olympia, WA 1:35  p.m. 
Philadelphia, PA 5:51 p.m. 
Portland, OR 1:37 p.m. 
Raleigh, NC 5:59 p.m. 
Richmond, VA 5:55  p.m. 
Sacramento, CA 1:52 p.m. 
Salem, OR 1:38  p.m. 
Salt Lake City, UT 3:05 p.m. 
San Antonio, TX 4:56 p.m. 
San Diego, CA 2:14 p.m. 
San Francisco, CA 1:52p.m. 
San Jose, CA 1:54  p.m. 
Santa Fe, NM 3:27 p.m.   
Seattle, WA 1:35  p.m. 
Springfield, IL 4:39 p.m. 
St. Louis, MO 4:41  p.m.  
Tallahassee, FL 6:09 p.m. 
Topeka, KS 4:34 p.m. 
Washington, DC 5:52  p.m.  


Eclipse times derived from:  “Eclipses During 2014,” F. Espenak, Observers Handbook: 2014, Royal Astronomical Society of Canada. 

Orionids Meteor Shower Peaks Early Tuesday Morning

Orionids meteor captured by a NASA all sky meteor camera.
Image Credit: NASA/MSFC/MEO


CAPE CANAVERAL, Florida --   The 2014 Orionid Meteor Shower peaks during the early morning of Tuesday, October 21, 2014.   Autumn's best meteor shower promises to be more spectacular than previous years thanks to dark skies from a New Moon that occurs on October 23.     


NASA is streaming a live broadcast of the Orionid meteor shower online for meteor watchers experiencing bad weather or light-polluted night skies.  The broadcast is located at the bottom of this article.



When is the best time to watch
Orionids meteor shower?


The best time to watch this October meteor shower is one to two hours before sunrise.   


 
What are the best dates to watch the Orionids meteor shower in October 2014?


Dark night skies are best for watching meteors, so the Moon plays an important role as to which dates are best for meteor shower viewing.  The Moon will decrease in brightness every night until a New Moon occurs on October 23, 2014.  After the New Moon, the moonrise will not occur until after sunrise from the 24th through the 28th.  So the darkest predawn mornings closest to the meteor shower's peak are October 21-24, 2014.


"We expect to see about 20 meteors per hour when the shower peaks on Tuesday morning, Oct 21st," says Bill Cooke, the head of NASA's Meteoroid Environment Office.  "With no Moon to spoil the show, observing conditions should be ideal." 



Where to look for the 2014 Orionids Meteor Shower tonight:

Orion Constellation.  Image Credit: NASA
Find Orion's noticeable three-star belt in the night sky, then follow his raised arm to his elbow to see the origination point of the Orionids (see image above).  Orion will be almost straight above the viewer's head 1 to 2 hours before sunrise.


The Orionid Meteor Shower is named after the constellation Orion because the meteors appear to come from just north of Orion's bright star Betelgeuse.  It is made up of debris left by Halley's Comet with a debris field that is so wide that encompasses the entire distance between the Earth and the Moon.